How to Add Custom Form Validation In Laravel?

6 minutes read

To add custom form validation in Laravel, you can create a new form request class by running the command php artisan make:request CustomRequest. In the newly created request class, you can define custom validation rules by overriding the rules() method. Within this method, you can specify the custom validation rules for the form fields.


After defining the custom validation rules, you can use the newly created form request class in your controller method by type hinting it. Laravel will automatically validate the incoming request based on the rules defined in the form request class.


If the validation fails, Laravel will redirect back to the form with the validation errors automatically available to be displayed. You can then display these errors in your view using Blade templating.


By following these steps, you can easily add custom form validation in your Laravel application to ensure that the data submitted by users meets your specific requirements.


How to pass custom validation rules as parameters to Laravel's validate method?

To pass custom validation rules as parameters to Laravel's validate method, you can use the Rule::passes() method along with the Validator facade to define your custom validation rules.


Here's an example of how you can pass custom validation rules as parameters to Laravel's validate method:

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use Illuminate\Support\Facades\Validator;
use Illuminate\Validation\Rule;

$data = $request->all();

$customRules = [
    'email' => [
        'required',
        Rule::unique('users')->where(function ($query) use ($data) {
            return $query->where('account_id', $data['account_id']);
        }),
    ],
    'password' => 'required|min:6',
];

$validator = Validator::make($data, $customRules);

if ($validator->fails()) {
    // Validation failed
    return response()->json($validator->errors(), 400);
}

// Validation passed
// Continue with your business logic


In this example, we are defining custom validation rules for the email field. The Rule::unique() method is used to check if the email is unique in the 'users' table based on the 'account_id' value provided in the request data.


You can add as many custom validation rules as needed for your fields. The Validator::make() method is used to create a new validator instance with the custom rules, and then you can check if the validation fails or passes.


If the validation fails, you can return the errors to the user. If the validation passes, you can continue with your business logic.


This is how you can pass custom validation rules as parameters to Laravel's validate method. Feel free to adjust and customize the custom rules based on your specific requirements.


How to use the validateWithBag method in Laravel for adding custom error messages to a separate validation error bag?

To use the validateWithBag method in Laravel for adding custom error messages to a separate validation error bag, you can follow these steps:

  1. Define a custom error bag in your controller:
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use Illuminate\Support\MessageBag;

$customErrorBag = new MessageBag();


  1. Use the validateWithBag method in your controller to perform validation and store the error messages in the custom error bag:
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$validatedData = $request->validate([
    'field1' => 'required',
    'field2' => 'required',
], [], $customErrorBag);


  1. Retrieve custom error messages from the custom error bag and display them in your view:
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$errors = $customErrorBag;

if ($errors->any()) {
    foreach ($errors->all() as $error) {
        // Display error message
    }
}


By following these steps, you can use the validateWithBag method in Laravel to add custom error messages to a separate validation error bag.


What are some advanced techniques for adding custom form validation in Laravel using service providers and middleware?

  1. Creating custom validation rules: One advanced technique is to create custom validation rules by extending Laravel's Validator class. This can be done by creating a new service provider which binds a custom validation rule within the boot method. This rule can then be used in the validation process within your application.
  2. Implementing custom validation logic in middleware: Another technique is to use middleware to perform custom form validation logic. This can be achieved by creating a new middleware class and adding your validation logic within the handle method. The middleware can then be applied to specific routes or groups of routes to validate form submissions before they reach the controller.
  3. Using form requests: Laravel provides a handy way to encapsulate form validation logic within form requests. By creating a form request class and defining validation rules within the rules method, you can easily validate form data before it reaches the controller method. This technique keeps validation logic neat and centralized within the form request class.
  4. Extending the Validator facade: Another advanced technique is to extend Laravel's Validator facade with custom validation methods that can be used throughout your application. This can be achieved by creating a new service provider which binds the custom validation methods within the boot method. These custom validation methods can then be used in the validation process by calling them from the Validator facade.


Overall, using service providers and middleware for custom form validation in Laravel can help keep your validation logic organized, reusable, and easy to maintain. It also allows for more flexibility and customization in handling form validation within your application.


How to create reusable custom validation rules in Laravel for multiple forms?

To create reusable custom validation rules in Laravel for multiple forms, follow these steps:

  1. Create a new service provider or use an existing one to register your custom validation rules. You can create a new provider by running the following command:
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php artisan make:provider ValidationServiceProvider


  1. Open the newly created provider file (ValidationServiceProvider.php) and add your custom validation rules inside the boot method like this:
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use Illuminate\Support\Facades\Validator;

public function boot()
{
    Validator::extend('custom_rule', function ($attribute, $value, $parameters, $validator) {
        // Your custom validation logic here
        return true; // Return true if the validation passes, false if it fails
    });
}


  1. Register your validation provider in the config/app.php file:
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'providers' => [
    // Other providers
    App\Providers\ValidationServiceProvider::class,
],


  1. Now, you can use your custom validation rule custom_rule in your form requests or controllers like this:
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use Illuminate\Foundation\Http\FormRequest;

class YourFormRequest extends FormRequest
{
    public function rules()
    {
        return [
            'field_name' => 'required|custom_rule',
        ];
    }
}


  1. You can also pass parameters to your custom validation rule like this:
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Validator::extend('custom_rule', function ($attribute, $value, $parameters, $validator) {
    $min_value = $parameters[0];
    $max_value = $parameters[1];

    return $value >= $min_value && $value <= $max_value;
});


By following these steps, you can create reusable custom validation rules in Laravel for multiple forms. This approach helps in keeping your validation rules DRY (Don't Repeat Yourself) and improves code reusability and maintainability.


How to test custom form validation rules in Laravel to ensure they are working correctly?

To test custom form validation rules in Laravel, you can create unit tests using PHPUnit.


Here's an example of how you can test a custom form validation rule called custom_rule:

  1. Create a new unit test file in the tests/Unit directory:
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php artisan make:test CustomRuleTest


  1. Add the following code to test the custom validation rule:
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namespace Tests\Unit;

use Tests\TestCase;

class CustomRuleTest extends TestCase
{
    public function testCustomRuleValidationPasses()
    {
        $validator = validator(['input' => 'valid'], [
            'input' => 'custom_rule'
        ]);

        $this->assertTrue($validator->passes());
    }

    public function testCustomRuleValidationFails()
    {
        $validator = validator(['input' => 'invalid'], [
            'input' => 'custom_rule'
        ]);

        $this->assertFalse($validator->passes());
    }
}


  1. Run the test by executing the following command in your terminal:
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phpunit


This will run the custom validation rule test and indicate whether it passed or failed. Make sure to replace 'custom_rule' with the name of your custom validation rule. You can add more test cases to cover different scenarios and edge cases for your custom rule.

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